January 2011


Installation and ongoing series of events

Intiated by: Marjolijn Dijkman

LUNÄ is one of the outcomes of: Please Excuse Our Appearance in 2007 at IKON Gallery (Birmingham, UK) organised by Enough Room for Space and Ikon Gallery

Activated at: Enough Room for Space HQ, Brussels, BE (ongoing since 2014), Forum Stadpark in Graz, AT (2012), NiMK in Amsterdam, NL (2011-2012), Onomatopee, Eindhoven, NL (2012), IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011), Spike Island, Bristol, UK (2011)

Special Thanks to: IKON Gallery, Jonathan Watkins, Helen Legg

Carpenter: James MacDonald

LUNÄ at IKON Gallery in Birmingham

The Lunar Society’s members have been called the fathers of the Industrial Revolution. The importance of this particular Society stems from its pioneering work in experimental chemistry, physics, engineering, and medicine, combined with leadership in manufacturing and commerce, and with political and social ideals. Its members were brilliant representatives of the informal scientific web which cut across class, blending the inherited skills of craftsmen with the theoretical advances of scholars, a key factor in Britain's leap ahead of the rest of Europe. – Jenny Uglow

LUNÄ is a facsimile of the original table around which an influential group of industrialists, poets, inventors, doctors, writers, physicists, chemists and thinkers known as the Lunar Society met each month in Birmingham between 1765 and 1813. Members included James Watt, Josiah Wedgwood, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley and Erasmus Darwin and they forged strong links with Bristol based contemporaries including Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Thomas Beddoes.

The society was given its name by the monthly meeting of the members at full moon during which the participants discussed their latest research, with the aim of learning from each other and sometimes they would develop projects collaboratively or support each others projects.

Since January 2011 the table is used in different locations including England, Austria and the Netherlands for an ongoing series of critical discussions updating topics that occupied the Lunar Men as new scientific and industrial developments, but also art, education and social rights.

LUNÄ collapses the optimistically progressive value systems that were enthusiastically promoted during the Enlightenment into the mass production and globalised retail environment that can be seen as their legacy today. LUNÄ is a replica of the Lunar table in the Soho house combined with a set of eight IKEA chairs.